Institution/Company:

Health Sciences North Research Institute

Location:

Sudbury

, Ontario

 Canada

Job Type:

Graduate Position

Degree Level Required:

Masters

324 days ago Apply now
Description:

The Verschoor laboratory is looking for a prospective PhD student to investigate the utility of epigenome-wide DNA methylation patterns as a tool to understand and define the risk of acute and long-term health outcomes. Current areas of interest include: 1) the epigenomic basis of chronic inflammation and its relation to health trajectories in older adults, and 2) the oral methylome as an indicator of treatment-related complications and survivorship in head and neck cancer patients. Our laboratory in situated at the Health Sciences North Research Institute in Sudbury, Ontario (hsnri.ca) and is affiliated with the Northern Ontario School of Medicine University (nosm.ca) and the School of Natural Sciences at Laurentian University (laurentian.ca/school/natural-sciences).

Responsibilities:

As described above.

Qualifications:

The successful applicant should have a background in medical sciences, epidemiology, bioinformatics and/or genetics, and be interested in research at the intersection of biomedical and data science. Those with significant experience in the analysis of array-based genomics platforms, particularly the Illumina 450K and/or MethylationEPIC bead-arrays, and related R-based bioinformatic packages are encouraged to apply. Strengths in quantitative approaches to cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis, especially generalized linear models, and data visualization methods are also important.

Additional Information:

Interested applicants should contact Dr. Chris Verschoor (cverschoor@hsnri.ca), making sure to include a 100-250 word statement of interest, CV and contact information for 2 references. Note: the prospective student would be expected to meet the eligibility criteria to enroll in the Biomolecular Sciences graduate program at Laurentian University (https://laurentian.ca/program/biomolecular-sciences-phd).

Keywords:

DNA methylation

epidemiology

health sciences

aging

inflammation

cancer

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